Horticulture News

Earth Kind Roses

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog, Horticulture News, Shrubs.

Hybrid tea roses are the darling of avid rosarians because of their spectacular blooms, rich, deep green foliage and repeat blooming qualities.  At the same time, they are the bane of the casual home gardener who sees them as a maintenance nightmare requiring a rigorous regimen of watering, fertilization and pesticide application. Rose beauty and…

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Ornamental Pepper

Posted by & filed under Annuals, Don Buma Blog, Horticulture News.

An annual that you might want to check out for your garden this coming season is the new Ornamental Pepper ‘Black Olive’, (Capsicum annuum ‘Black Olive’)  It went through nation-wide testing last year in All America Selections trial gardens and was reported as a standout, especially in southern gardens where heat was a major factor. …

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September Gardening Tips

Posted by & filed under Horticulture News.

Work on cutting back your exhausted perennials.  Some will die back earlier than others and some will die back a little at a time.  Generally, if the foliage and stems are brown or fallen over it’s time to cut it back.  If the stems are brown, but still sturdy and upright you might choose to…

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Storing Summer Bulbs

Posted by & filed under Horticulture News.

Donald Buma, Norfolk Botanical Garden Executive Director As cold weather approaches, it is time to begin planning to store summer bulbs such as gladiolus, caladium and dahlia.  These plants need to be dug up and stored so they can be planted next year. These plants should be dug after frost has caused the tops to…

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Year of the Tomato and Zinnia

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog, Horticulture News.

The National Garden Bureau has recently announced that 2011 is the Year of the Tomato for vegetables and the Year of the Zinnia for flowers. Each year since 1982, the National Garden Bureau has selected a flower and a vegetable for its “Year of the” program.  Selection is based on the ease of growth of…

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Twig Girdlers

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog, Horticulture News.

About this time of year you will begin to see damage from twig girdlers.  Oak is usually the primary host although other trees include elm, linden, hackberry, apple, pecan, persimmon, poplar, sour gum, honey locust, dogwood and some flowering fruit trees.  There will be fallen twigs, sometimes up to 3 feet long. The most likely…

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Dividing Daylilies

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog, Horticulture News.

For the healthiest growth and most abundant bloom, you should divide daylilies every three to four years.  They can be divided in early spring growth starts, but it is more common to divide them in late summer.  Daylilies have a tough root system that can make them difficult to divide.  Although plants can be divided…

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Tomatoes and High Temperatures

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog, Horticulture News.

The color of your tomatoes can be affected by high temperatures.  Red pigments don’t form properly when temperatures rise above 95 degrees F.  The orange and yellow pigments are not similarly affected.  The result is often orange-colored tomatoes rather than the usual “tomato red”.  There is no reduction in the edibility or taste of the…

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Tomato Cracking

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog, Horticulture News.

Tomatoes cracking, which usually occurs on the upper part of the tomato can be either concentric (in concentric circles around the stem) or radial (radiating from the stem).  The problem is often caused by pressure inside the fruit that is more than the skin can handle.  Although a definitive reason for cracking is not known,…

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Slime Mold

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog, Horticulture News.

Slime molds are primitive organisms that often occur on mulch.  They often attract attention because of their bright colors and disgusting appearance. Common names are generally quite descriptive. For example, the “dog vomit” slime mold is a bright, whitish color that resembles its namesake. It eventually turns brown and then into a hard, white mass….

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