Posts By: Donald R. Buma

Donald Buma, Norfolk Botanical Garden Executive Director Hybrid tea roses are the darling of avid rosarians because of their spectacular blooms, rich, deep green foliage and repeat blooming qualities. At the same time, they are the bane of the casual home gardener who sees them as a maintenance nightmare requiring a rigorous regimen of watering,…


Growing Your Easter Lilies Outside

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog, Perennials.

Do you hate to simply discard your Easter Lily after it has finished blooming? Here is some advice provided the Kansas State University Extension Service for repeat bloom in subsequent years. After the flowers have faded, remove the flower stalk so that energy does not go into making seed. Keep the plant inside until the…

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Pokeweed

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog, Horticulture News.

News-tout-pokeweed

Here is some information about pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) that was recently posted by the Kansas State University Extension Horticulture Division.  These plants are becoming increasingly apparent at this time of year in gardens and along roadsides.  Some of you may remember when this plant received a fair amount of airtime when Elvis Presley recorded a…

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Easter Lily

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog.

Did you get an Easter Lily (Lilium longiflorum) and want to see if you can grow it in your garden?  Though not always reliable, you may have success with the following guidelines. Set out in the garden after the flowers have faded, remove the flower stalk so it does not go to seed. Choose a…

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Is It a Product of Genetic Engineering (ge) or a Genetically Modified Organism (gmo)?

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog, Horticulture News.

The terms Genetic Engineering (GE) and Genetically Modified Organisim (GMO) are often used interchangeably in the media.  However, there is a difference.  GE refers to a high-tech genetic engineering processes that are used to incorporate genes from one organism directly into another.  This is done by using recombinant DNA techniques that bring together genetic material…

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Forcing Woody Plants for Indoor Bloom

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog, Shrubs.

There are a number of plants that you can force into bloom for indoor display. Three of the easiest are forsythia, pussywillow, and flowering quince.  Prune branches that you wish to force on a day that is above freezing.  The branches should be 3 feet long or less and placed into a bucket of water…

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Earth Kind Roses

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog, Horticulture News, Shrubs.

Hybrid tea roses are the darling of avid rosarians because of their spectacular blooms, rich, deep green foliage and repeat blooming qualities.  At the same time, they are the bane of the casual home gardener who sees them as a maintenance nightmare requiring a rigorous regimen of watering, fertilization and pesticide application. Rose beauty and…

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Ornamental Pepper

Posted by & filed under Annuals, Don Buma Blog, Horticulture News.

An annual that you might want to check out for your garden this coming season is the new Ornamental Pepper ‘Black Olive’, (Capsicum annuum ‘Black Olive’)  It went through nation-wide testing last year in All America Selections trial gardens and was reported as a standout, especially in southern gardens where heat was a major factor. …

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Storing Summer Bulbs

Posted by & filed under Horticulture News.

Donald Buma, Norfolk Botanical Garden Executive Director As cold weather approaches, it is time to begin planning to store summer bulbs such as gladiolus, caladium and dahlia.  These plants need to be dug up and stored so they can be planted next year. These plants should be dug after frost has caused the tops to…

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Year of the Tomato and Zinnia

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog, Horticulture News.

The National Garden Bureau has recently announced that 2011 is the Year of the Tomato for vegetables and the Year of the Zinnia for flowers. Each year since 1982, the National Garden Bureau has selected a flower and a vegetable for its “Year of the” program.  Selection is based on the ease of growth of…

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Twig Girdlers

Posted by & filed under Don Buma Blog, Horticulture News.

About this time of year you will begin to see damage from twig girdlers.  Oak is usually the primary host although other trees include elm, linden, hackberry, apple, pecan, persimmon, poplar, sour gum, honey locust, dogwood and some flowering fruit trees.  There will be fallen twigs, sometimes up to 3 feet long. The most likely…

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